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Bob Lape Biography, News, Age , Height, and Net Worth

Bob Lape (born Robert Cable Lape) is an American broadcast journalist, writer, restaurant reviewer, and food critic. Lape worked as a reporter and news director at WCUE in Akron, Ohio, WICE in Providence, Rhode

 

Bob Lape Biography

Bob Lape (born Robert Cable Lape) is an American broadcast journalist, writer, restaurant reviewer, and food critic. Lape worked as a reporter and news director at WCUE in Akron, Ohio, WICE in Providence, RhodeIsland and WBZ in Boston, Massachusetts, before joining WABC-TV in New York City as a charter member of the Eyewitness News[1] team in 1968. Originally hired as a political and crime reporter (beats he would continue throughout his run with the station), as well as being an occasional anchor, Lape started a segment called “The Eyewitness Gourmet” in 1970.

Bob Lape Age

Have you been wondering how old is the American broadcast journalist, writer, restaurant reviewer, and food critic? well according to our research he was born in  1934 (age 85 years), Akron, OH.

Bob Lape Height

Information concerning his height is still under research and will soon be updated immediately we come across details about his height,

Bob Lape Career

She worked as a reporter and news director at WCUE in Akron, Ohio, WICE in Providence, Rhode Island and WBZ in Boston, Massachusetts, before joining WABC-TV in New York City as a charter member of the Eyewitness News[1] team in 1968. Originally hired as a political and crime reporter (beats he would continue throughout his run with the station), as well as being an occasional anchor, Lape started a segment called “The Eyewitness Gourmet” in 1970. It became a highly popular feature on the program, running 1,200 times in 12 years and was called “the harbinger of the Television Food Network” by restaurateur Drew Nieporent. Lape also reviewed film and theater for WBZ-TV and WKBG-TV in Boston and for WABC-TV.

After leaving Eyewitness News, he hosted a phone in a talk show, Bob Lape’s Food Show, on WABC (AM) and wrote a restaurant column in the New York Law Journal. He also served as a network radio news correspondent for the ABC Information Network. His restaurant review column in Crain’s New York Business was its most popular feature for 24 years, and “Bob Lape’s Dining Diary,” broadcast on WCBS since 1986, focuses on eating and drinking reviews, trends and events. Lape is the author of the journals Epicurean Rendezvous, 1990-1996, and Bob Lape’s Restaurant Index, 1987-1991 (along with art by Milton Glaser). Lape is a co-author with Joanna Pruess of the book Seduced by Bacon: Recipes & Lore About America’s Favorite Indulgence ISBN 1-59228-851-0

Bob Lape Net Worth

Information concerning his net worth is still under research and will soon be updated immediately we come across details about his net worth.

Bob Lape News

THE BEST OF BOB LAPE

La Colombe d’Or 2 stars

134 E. 26th St. (between Lexington and Third avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 689-0666. It’s deja vu all over again at the bistro that lit the city’s Provencal fire 20 years ago. George and Helen Studley and chef Naj Zougari are back after two years, with warm, cozy comfort and lots of cassoulet.

Al Bustan 2 1/2 stars

827 Third Ave. (between 50th and 51st streets), Manhattan.

(212) 759-8439. New York’s premier Lebanese restaurant draws diplomats and fans from all nations. Sophisticated service of 36 meze-superbly fresh Middle Eastern appetizers-grilled fish, lamb, chicken and more. Attractive setting, good wines.

MariaElena 2 stars

133 W. 13th St. (between Sixth and Seventh avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 741-3663. Lively new Italian with savvy chef Franco Migliorini da Lavagna setting off flavor explosions for its bright, attractive young owner. Eclectic clientele, two fireplaces and a big garden for warmer times.

Maloney & Porcelli 3 stars

37 E. 50th St. (between Park and Madison avenues), Manhattan. (212) 750-2233. The fun is on the plate and there’s plenty of it at the new hit Alan Stillman restaurant. A delicious blend of steak house and creative American cooking, with everything from pizza to “swordfish London broil.”

Windows on the World 2 stars

1 World Trade Center, Manhattan. (212) 524-7000. Twenty years after creating the 107th-floor food fantasy, Joe Baum does it again. W.O.W. returns with awesome views, nonstop global goodies, 20,000 bottles of wine and impeccable service.

Pelago 2 stars

157 E. 55th St. (between Second and Third avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 935-4321. Chef Ian Russo’s creative and contemporary Mediterranean-inspired dishes seize the eye and please the palate. One of the brightest newcomers of the year with exceptionally pleasant service, informal setting.

Morton’s of Chicago 2 1/2 stars

90 West St. (at Albany Street), Manhattan. (212) 732-5665. Bulls and bears noisily belly up to splendid steaks and awesome lobsters, and take in the obligatory show-and-tell schtick at the chain’s hottest steak house.

Bombay Palace 2 stars

30 W. 52nd St. (between Fifth and Sixth avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 541-7777. Completely revamped in clubby wood paneling, the 17-year-old Indian showplace returns, its $9.95 luncheon buffet price intact. Tandoor-baked whole trout and Cornish hen are among many light, delicate new dishes.

Daniel 4 stars

20 E. 76th St. (between Madison and Fifth avenues), Manhattan. (212) 288-0033. Acclaimed internationally, Daniel Boulud’s inspired cuisine is rich in seasonal surprises. World-class wine list; meticulous service, too.

Bridge Street 2 1/2 stars

1 Bridge St., Irvington, N.Y.

(914) 591-2233. New crowd-pleasing, casual contemporary American at the railroad station. Former factory space glows with chef David Thomas’ gently creative, delicious cooking and warm, thoughtful service. Well-made wine list, too, priced right.

Limoncello 2 stars

The Michelangelo Hotel, 777 Seventh Ave. (at 51st Street), Manhattan. (212) 582-7932. Romeo De Gobbi (Le Pactole) returns to midtown with a fresh, sprightly, informal Italian restaurant catering to appetites of every size. “Italian food with American style” is the realized aim. Try Spaghetti Limoncello, and inspect The Grotto downstairs.

Ruga 2 1/2 stars

4 Barbara Lane (Route 208), Oakland, N.J. (201) 337-0813. Creative, generously portioned contemporary food in the Ramapo foothills. Comfortable rooms decorated with artist Edward Ruga’s paintings. Pleasant service and, often, live music.

Grissini Trattoria 2 stars

484 Sylvan Ave. (Route 9W), Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

(201) 568-3535. Luxury cars surround this upscale trattoria, featuring authentic Italian cookery, striking wood-and-metal decor by Tony Chi, and an SRO clientele having noisy fun.

Arizona 206 2 1/2 stars

206 E. 60th St. (between Second and Third avenues), Manhattan. (212) 838-0440. Bison, ostrich, venison, game birds and many other vivid dishes at this Southwestern standout as new chef Miles Angelo turns up the heat. Intelligent service, unusually diverse beverages.

Marguery Grill 2 1/2 stars

133 E. 65th St. (between Lexington and Park avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 744-2533. Casually elegant, this duplex townhouse is the new star in the old Le Cirque neighborhood. Chef Gerry Hayden’s contemporary American menu is good to the last drop. Don’t miss desserts and the $35 prix fixe.

Naples 2 stars

MetLife Building, 200 Park Ave.

(at 45th Street), Manhattan.

(212) 972-7001. A vast, noisy, authentic Neapolitan pizzeria and ristorante fills the former Trattoria site. Eat inside or out, picking from 25 small plates plus pastas, mains and thin-crusted pizza sold by the half-meter (about a yard).

Zeppole 2 stars

186 Franklin St. (between Hudson and Greenwich streets), Manhattan. (212) 431-1114. Taste leader Drew Nieporent puts ace chef Frank Crispo on the casual Italian beat with a relaxed restaurant whose earthy food gets a gentle, light spin. Sharing space with TriBakery means uncommonly good sandwiches, bruschetta salads, too.

Stresa 2 1/2 stars

1524 Northern Blvd., Manhasset. (516) 365-6956. The impeccably run younger sib of equally popular Navonna in Great Neck, Stresa flirts with three stars. Long Islanders come early and linger for superior service of very good Italian food.

Jonathan’s 2 stars

3000 Jericho Turnpike, Garden City Park. (516) 742-7300. “New American” cuisine takes in a world of flavor at this handsome casual contemporary. Thirteen salads can get meal-sized, but don’t miss pastas, grills and seafood, priced right.

Raphael 3 stars

33 W. 54th St. (between Fifth and Sixth avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 582-8993. Raphael and Mira Edery’s cozy, romantic home of nouvelle cuisine in New York excels in its 19th year. Chef David McInerney is a wizard of delicate, flavorful dishes. Fine desserts and superior service make it irresistible.

Gage & Tollner 2 stars

372 Fulton St. (at Jay Street), Brooklyn. (718) 875-5181. Downtown Brooklyn’s 1879 landmark, superbly restored, is back. Try classic she-crab soup and fried clam bellies. Free valet parking; top service, too.

Barbetta 2 1/2 stars

321 W. 46th St. (between Eighth and Ninth avenues), Manhattan. (212) 246-9171. Ninety is the magic number for this Restaurant Row veteran. Opened in 1906 and still in the original family, it has elegant inside dining, Piedmontese style, or a gorgeous garden for al fresco romance.

Chaz & Wilson Grill 2 stars

201 W. 79th St. (west of Amsterdam Avenue), Manhattan.

(212) 769-0100. Eclectic taste leader David Ruggerio (Le Chantilly, Nonna) joins West Sider Debbie Wilson to boost this 10-year-old onto the food map. Lively, delicious, mod American dishes are ridiculously reasonable early in the week.

Trattoria Dopo Teatro 2 stars

125 W. 44th St. (between Sixth and Seventh avenues), Manhattan.

(212) 869-2849. Architect Emilio Barletta designed his own restaurant in the theater district with ancient Roman touches, a bold brick oven, and an antique bar.

Cafe des Artistes 3 stars

1 W. 67th St. (between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue), Manhattan. (212) 877-3500. In its 80th year, this romantic wonder boasts an eclectic, irresistible menu. Sturgeon schnitzel, swordfish paillard, 27 desserts and the cozy new Parlor nearby for smokers.

Sullivan’s Restaurant

and Broadcast Lounge 2 1/2 stars

1697 Broadway (between 53rd and 54th streets), Manhattan.

(212) 541-1697. An important addition to the theater district scene. There are 24 steps up, but chef Neil Murphy’s inspired steakhouse and Chinese menus, James Biber’s richly theatrical decor, and friendly service make it all worthwhile.