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Jason Whitlock Bio, Age, Espn, Family, Wife, Net Worth and Salary  

Jason Whitlock is a former sportswriter for ESPN and a former columnist at the Kansas City Star, AOL Sports and Foxsports.com, as well as a radio person…

Jason Whitlock Biography

Jason Whitlock(Jason Lee Whitlock) is an American sports journalist. Jason co-hosts the daily sports TV show Speak For Yourself alongside Marcellus Wiley on Fox Sports 1. He is a former sportswriter for ESPN(2002-2006) and a former columnist at the Kansas City Star, AOL Sports, and Foxsports.com.

Also as a radio personality for WHB and KCSP sports stations in the Kansas City area. Whitlock played Division I college football at Ball State as an offensive lineman. As of 2019, he co-hosts the daily sports TV show ‘Speak for Yourself’ with Colin Cowherd on Fox Sports.

Jason Whitlock Age

Jason Lee Whitlock is an American sports journalist. He co-hosts the daily sports TV show Speak For Yourself alongside Marcellus Wiley on Fox Sports 1. He was born on April 27.1967 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Thus Jason Lee is 52 years old as of 2019.

Jason Whitlock Family

He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana to James “Jimmy” Whitlock(father) and Joyce Whitlock(mother). Growing up was not peaceful for him as his father was always gambling than being home with his family, as a result of this, his parents divorced after eight years of marriage. He has a brother, James Whitlock II(named after their father – James).

Jason Whitlock Education

He studied at Warren Central High School in Warren Township. He played football in the first place there as the offensive lineman.

He also attended Ball State University on a football scholarship and played as an offensive lineman. In 1990, he graduated with a degree in journalism from there.

Jason Whitlock Wife | Jason Whitlock Wife Pics

Whitlock is single as of 2019. Although he is seen hanging out with different girls multiple times, he is not in a relationship with anyone.

He holds the opinion that marriage is a distraction and that being single will make him more focused and determined in his career. He has been questioned severally during interviews on his plans on marriage but he has playfully made it clear that being single is enjoyable and has its own benefits.

Jason Whitlock Image

Jason Whitlock Net Worth

Jason Whitlock has an estimated Net worth of $10 million dollars as of 2019. This is due to his $2.1 million sign-up contract with FOX Sports and the annual salary he earns.

Jason Whitlock Salary

His’s previous salary was between ($150,000 and $200,000). The new $700,000 annual salary was a bump for him.

In 2012, he sold his dream home in South Overland Park, where he stayed for nearly a decade. The home was reported to have been on sale for two years.

He initially requested $260,000. When the house was sold, he had to deal with the market realities because the demand price was down to $225,000. Later, it was sold for $208,000, deducting the commission of the real state.

Jason Whitlock Espn

Jason Whitlock out at ESPN

The ESPN exodus continued Sunday, with the talented, controversial and recently demoted Jason Whitlock parting ways with the company, according to Richard Deitsch of Sports Illustrated. ESPN bought out Whitlock’s contract says Deitsch, continuing a trend of high-profile departures from the network.

He lasted barely two years into his second stint with the company. He returned in August of 2013 to head a site eventually named The Undefeated “but one that had been developed under the working title “Black Grantland,” a reference to how Whitlock’s site would focus on the convergence of race and sport while featuring the same sort of thoughtful, in-depth pieces that often appeared on the site founded by Bill Simmons”.

Notwithstanding some marquee hires, such as Mike Wise of The Washington Post, the site still hasn’t launched — it’s been like ESPN’s version of Chinese Democracy or Detox — and this summer, Whitlock was replaced at the top by Leon Carter, the editor of the website’s New York branch and former New York Daily News sports editor.
In a circulated statement, ESPN was terse in describing its split with Whitlock who, for what it’s worth, was one of the most watchable guest hosts on Pardon The Interruption:

“We have mutually agreed to part ways, which was Jason’s preference following the shift from his role as Editor-in-Chief. Jason is a talented print and television commentator, and we wish him success in his next chapter. ESPN remains fully committed to The Undefeated and plans continue toward an official launch.”

He joins Bill Simmons, Colin Cowherd, Keith Olbermann as recent departures. But other than those PTI guest spots, his presence wasn’t as pronounced on the network as the men who preceded him out of Bristol. That was especially odd for someone with a grand presence and vocal, unapologetic opinions. Deitsch guesses Whitlock is a natural to rejoin Fox Sports, where he worked in between ESPN stints.

Jason Whitlock Play Football

Leaving ESPN for AOL Sports
In 2006, he reported the departure of his online column from ESPN.com’s in favor of AOL Sports but originally expected to continue his television work for ESPN. However, after the announcement, he was interviewed by sports blog The Big Lead and disparaged two of his ESPN colleagues. The sports reporter labeled Mike Lupica “an insecure, mean-spirited busybody”, and called Robert “Scoop” Jackson a “clown”, saying that “the publishing of (Jackson’s) fake ghetto posturing is an insult to black intelligence.”

Jackson, like Whitlock, is African-American. Whitlock then retired from all ESPN television work. He soon announced to The Kansas City Star readers in September 2006 that he was fired altogether from ESPN as a result of his remarks; he wrote that the company does not tolerate criticism and acted as they saw fit. His’s first AOL Sports column was published September 29. 2006.

Fox Sports
Whitlock’s first Fox Sports on MSN column was published August 16. 2007. On February 10. 2012, in the middle of the Knicks’ 92–85 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers, with Jeremy Lin scoring a career-high 38 points, Whitlock posted on Twitter that “some lucky lady in NYC is gonna feel a couple of inches of pain tonight.” Silvie Kim wrote in Hyphen that Whitlock “reinforced the insipid and insidious ‘small Asian penis’ stereotype. The Asian American Journalists Association demanded an apology. Later, Whitlock said, “I debased a feel-good sports moment. For that, I’m truly sorry.”

Jason Whitlock Ball State Football Stats

Jason Whitlock surprises Ball State football walk-on with scholarship

Ball State head football coach Mike Neu thought why to surprise one of his walk-on players with a full-ride scholarship himself when he could bring in FS1 host Jason Whitlock to do it for him.

Whitlock, who was an offensive lineman for Ball State from (1985 to 1989) before he became a sports journalist, Facetimed into a team meeting so he could offer inspiration to the Cardinals before delivering some wonderful news to Cody Rudy, a redshirt sophomore fullback.

During the team meeting, Whitlock talked about former Ball State football players who made a big impact on their respective squads. The last player he spoke of was Blaine Bishop, “the greatest player probably in Ball State history,” according to Whitlock. Bishop walked onto the team and ended up being a four-time Pro Bowl selection.

“And (Bishop) reminds me — this is going to blow your mind when I say this of who he reminds me of — but he reminds me of Cody Rudy, a guy who walked on and has proven he is worthy of a scholarship.”

The entire room erupted with the news and hugged Rudy while chanting “Rudy! Rudy! Rudy!” The whole scene was very reminiscent of Rudy, the 1993 sports film about Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger, who long dreamed of playing football at Notre Dame despite having a learning disability and being significantly undersized.

Jason Whitlock Kate Smith

If We Cancel Kate Smith, We Must Cancel The New York Yankees

The Yankees have banished Kate Smith to the dustbin for singing silly songs. Let’s banish the Yankees for their decades of racism.

It was announced this week that both the New York Yankees and the Philadelphia Flyers would stop using their traditional recorded version of Kate Smith singing “God Bless America” during their games. This happened after it surfaced that Smith had performed songs now considered racist during her heyday in the 1930s. The Flyers, with whom Smith is more closely aligned as the good luck charm for their 1974 Stanley Cup run, even removed a statue of her from the Philadelphia sports complex.

In a brilliant monologue, sports commentator Jason Whitlock broke down the absurdity of these moves. The whole video is worth watching. Among other things, Whitlock points out that the song “That’s Why The Darkies Were Born,” recorded by Smith in the 1930s, was satire that was also performed by black civil rights legend Paul Robeson. I hope Robeson, one of the most important black figures of the 20th century, won’t have to meet this same fate.

But I would like to focus for a moment on the New York Yankees, which is arguably the most important sports franchise in the world. The irony of this team canceling Smith for actions she took almost a century ago that are only mildly problematic, while their own team refused to hire black ballplayers, is astounding.

Smith sang a silly song. The Yankees systematically denied qualified black baseball players the right to make a good a living for more than half a century. So why is Smith being exiled while the Bronx Bombers go along as nothing happened? The answer is that throwing Smith under the bus more than 40 years after her death costs nothing. It is the empty virtue signaling that corporate America prefers to reflect on their actions.

If we must lose Smith — if her status must be taken down if her songs must be silenced — then how do we justify allowing modern players, including black players, to wear the uniform of a team that denied black Americans agency and personhood? Any fair treatment of this situation would require that the Yankee pinstripes be retired right alongside Smith.

Amidst the controversy, Stephen Smith of ESPN chimed in to try to explain why banishing Kate Smith is acceptable. His co-panelist Will Cain argued that if we go down this road of dragging everyone who did something inappropriate nearly a century ago, who will be left? He even pointed out that maybe Barack Obama should be canceled for his bigoted views on gay marriage, and that was only a decade ago. Smith thought he had an answer.

He said, “That’s pretty d-mn easy for you to say because you’re not the offended party. It’s really easy for the group that is not the offended party to take that position.” Cain replied, “There will always be an offended party, Stephen A, and they’ll make that argument to you one day.” Count on it.

Smith’s deeply misguided point seems to be that if some group of people is offended — and it’s not entirely clear who actually is offended by Kate Smith — then their destructive desires must be entertained and acted upon. No discussion is needed, no context is required, no good works come into play. Just tear down the statue and throw the offender into the dustbin of history.

Fair enough. I am deeply offended by the fact that the New York Yankees refused to field a black player for the first half of the 20th century. Don’t tell me that’s just how it was. Don’t tell me it was the rule. Branch Rickey and the Brooklyn Dodgers had the courage to break that rule in the 1940s, well before the beloved Yankees did. How can this be forgiven? How can we celebrate their legacy while Kate Smith’s is destroyed?

The only fair and just thing to do here is for the New York Yankees franchise to fold, along with all but the expansion Major League Baseball franchises that came into being after integration. We can replace them quickly with new teams, teams that never denied black people the right to play. If Kate Smith is being canceled for her actions 80 years ago, then so must the New York Yankees be.

These are the rules. Well, sort of. These are the rules when it doesn’t cost anybody any money. These are the rules when we decide to deride the memory of a woman who achieved greatness at a time when that was very hard.

She immortalized a second national anthem and raised millions to support the war effort in World War II. Yet she is a problem for singing a satirical song. But Joe DiMaggio is a hero even though he consented to outright racism that helped him secure his job. Let’s end the Yankees. Please sign my petition. APRIL 23. 2019 By David Marcus

Jason Whitlock articles

Some of his’s popular articles on ESPN

Whitlock: Why black folks can’t breathe

Espn.com — December 8. 2014Jason Whitlock, ESPN Senior WriterClose• Columnist for Fox Sports from 2010-2013• Columnist at the Kansas City Star for 16 years• ESPN.com Page 2 columnist from 2002 to 2006Order rooted in and maintained and restored by fear, intimidation, brutality, and incarceration is immoral and untenable. Justice is order’s intended soul mate. But serving justice is twice as hard as serving fear.

Whitlock: RG III a victim of his own swagger

Espn.com — Dec 12, 2013Jason Whitlock, ESPN Senior WriterClose• Columnist for Fox Sports from 2010-2013• Columnist at the Kansas City Star for 16 years• ESPN.com Page 2 columnist from 2002 to 2006It is not surprising that in a culture that has overdosed on confidence and swagger, we have little appreciation for understanding the importance of humility. False confidence forms the foundation of our individual and collective distorted reality. We lie to young people with phony affirmation.

Jason Whitlock: Ball State’s decision to remove John Schnatter’s name an act of cowardice

The starpress.com — The decision to distance Ball State University from one of its most successful alumni, Papa John Schnatter, required little courage and even less leadership. To not engage with Mr. Schnatter in hopes of finding a path toward forgiveness, reconciliation and deeds that empowered black students is both shocking and disappointing. It’s a blatant act of cowardice by Ball State President Mearns and BSU’s black faculty, the adults allegedly in charge of shepherding young people.

Jason Whitlock: Ball State’s decision to remove John Schnatter’s name an act of cowardice

Indystar.com — The decision to distance Ball State University from one of its most successful alumni, Papa John Schnatter, required little courage and even less leadership. To not engage with Mr. Schnatter in hopes of finding a path toward forgiveness, reconciliation and deeds that empowered black students is both shocking and disappointing. It’s a blatant act of cowardice by Ball State President Mearns and BSU’s black faculty, the adults allegedly in charge of shepherding young people.