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Jim Bouton Biography, Age, Height, Family, Net Worth, Career, YouTube and Education

Jim Bouton ( born James Alan Bouton) is an American retired professional baseball player. Bouton played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a pitcher for the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Houston

 

Jim Bouton Biography

Jim Bouton ( born James Alan Bouton) is an American retired professional baseball player. Bouton played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a pitcher for the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Houston Astros, and Atlanta Braves between 1962 and 1978. He has also been a best-selling author, actor, activist, sportscaster and one of the creators of Big League Chew. Bouton played college baseball at Western Michigan University, before signing his first professional contract with the Yankees. He was a member of the 1962 World Series champions, appeared in the 1963 MLB All-Star Game, and won both of his starts in the 1964 World Series. Later in his career, he developed and threw a knuckleball. Bouton authored the baseball book Ball Four, which was a combination diary of his 1969 season and memoir of his years with the Yankees, Pilots, and Astros.

Jim Bouton Age

Jim Bouton an American retired professional baseball player was born on March 8, 1939, in  Newark, NJ. He is 81 years old as of 2019.

Jim Bouton Height

Have you been wondering how tall is the American retired professional baseball player, well, I guess you are at the right place. According to our research, he has a standing height of 6 feet 0 inches tall.

Jim Bouton Family

He was born in Newark, New Jersey. He grew up as a fan of the New York Giants in Rochelle Park, New Jersey, where he lived until the age of 13. He lived with his family in Ridgewood, New Jersey until he was 15 when his family relocated to Chicago Heights, Illinois. Bouton enrolled at Bloom High School, where he played for the school’s baseball team. Bouton was nicknamed “Warm-Up Bouton” because he never got to play in a game, serving much of his time as a benchwarmer. Bloom’s star pitcher at that time was Jerry Colangelo, who later would become the owner of the Arizona Diamondbacks and Phoenix Suns. In summer leagues, Bouton did not throw particularly hard, but he got batters out by mixing conventional pitches with the knuckleball that he had experimented with since childhood.

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Jim Bouton Wife

Bouton and his first wife Bobbie had two children together, Michael and Laurie, and adopted a Korean orphan, Kyong Jo. Kyong Jo later changed his name to David. Bobbie and Bouton divorced in 1981. In 1983, Bouton’s ex-wife teamed up with Nancy Marshall, the former wife of pitcher Mike Marshall, to write a tell-all book called Home Games. In response to the book’s publication, Bouton commented:

We all have the right to write about our lives, and she does, too. If the book is insightful, if it helps people, I may be applauding it.

I’m sure most of the things she says are true. I smoked grass, I ran around, I found excuses to stay on the road. It got so bad that I smoked grass to numb myself. It took me a year to where my brain worked again. I no longer think of grass as harmless. We were in the death throes of a marriage. She should ask herself how did she not see these things.

In 1997, Laurie was killed in a car accident at age 31. Bouton is now married to Paula Kurman. They have six grandchildren.

In 2012, Bouton suffered a stroke that did not impair him physically but damaged his memory and speaking.

Bouton promotes the Vintage Base Ball Federation to form vintage clubs and leagues internationally, to codify the rules and equipment of its 19th-century origins, and to organize competitions.

Bouton was a delegate to the 1972 Democratic National Convention for George McGovern.

Jim Bouton Education

He attended Western Michigan University and pitched for the Western Michigan Broncos baseball team. He earned a scholarship for his second year. That summer, he played amateur baseball, catching the attention of scouts. Yankees scout Art Stewart signed Bouton for $30,000.

Jim Bouton Career

He began started his major league career in 1962 with the Yankees, where his tenacity earned him the nickname “Bulldog.” By this time, he had developed a formidable fastball. He also came to be known for his cap flying off his head at the completion of his delivery to the plate, as well as for his uniform number 56, a number usually assigned in spring training to players designated for the minor leagues. (Bouton later explained that he had been assigned the number in 1962 when he was promoted to the Yankees, and wanted to keep it as a reminder of how close he had come to not making the ball club. He wore number 56 throughout most of his major league career.)He appeared in 36 games during the 1962 season, including 16 starts, and had a win-loss record of 7–7.

He did not play in the Yankees’ 1962 World Series victory over the San Francisco Giants, although he had originally been slated to start Game 7. When the game was postponed a day because of rain, Ralph Terry pitched instead. Bouton went 21–7 and 18–13 in the next two seasons, and appeared in the 1963 All-Star Game. He was 2–1 with a 1.48 ERA in World Series play. A memorable duel between Bouton and Don Drysdale of the Los Angeles Dodgers occurred in Game 3 of the 1963 World Series before a crowd of 55,912 at Dodger Stadium. Drysdale pitched a three-hit shutout in a 1-0 victory, Bouton giving up just four hits for the Yankees.

The only run scored in the first inning on a walk, wild pitch and single by Tommy Davis that bounced off the pitching mound. He won both his starts in the 1964 World Series. He beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 with a complete-game six-hitter on Oct. 10 on a walk-off home run by Mickey Mantle, then won again on Oct. 14 at Busch Stadium, 8-3, backed by another Mantle homer and a Joe Pepitone grand slam.

Jim Bouton Net Worth

Jim Bouton is an American former professional baseball player who has a net worth of $40 million. He was born in Newark, New Jersey in March 1939. He was a pitcher who batted and threw right-handed.

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