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Mary Lyons Biography, Age, Husband, Married, Family, Photo,

Mary Lyons is a Digital Journalist at WHAS11 news in Louisville, Ky, specializing in general assignment reporting. She studied and graduated from Indiana…

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Mary Lyons Biography | Mary Lyons

Mary Lyons is a Digital Journalist at WHAS11 news in Louisville, Ky, specializing in general assignment reporting. She studied and graduated from Indiana University Southeast. Contact Mary Lyons at mlyons@whas11.com.

Mary Lyons Age

Mary Lyons is a Digital Journalist at WHAS11 news in Louisville, Ky, specializing in general assignment reporting. She studied and graduated from Indiana University Southeast. Her Pieces of information about the birth date, Age, month are not yet revealed up to now but stay ready for the update soon

Mary Lyons Husband, Married, Family

Mary Lyons is a Digital Journalist at WHAS11 news in Louisville, Ky, specializing in general assignment reporting. She studied and graduated from Indiana University Southeast. Her Pieces of information about Marriages, Family, and Husband is not yet revealed yet but stay ready for the update soon. Read also about C.J. Daniels

Mary Lyons Digital journalism

Digital journalism, also known as online journalism, is a contemporary form of journalism where editorial content is distributed via the Internet, as opposed to publishing via print or broadcast.

What constitutes digital journalism is debated by scholars; however, the primary product of journalism, which is news and features on current affairs, is presented solely or in combination as text, audio, video, or some interactive forms like news games, and disseminated through digital media technology.

Fewer barriers to entry lowered distribution costs, and diverse computer networking technologies have led to the widespread practice of digital journalism. It has democratized the flow of information that was previously controlled by traditional media including newspapers, magazines, radio, and television.

Some have asserted that a greater degree of creativity can be exercised with digital journalism when compared to traditional journalism and traditional media. The digital aspect may be central to the journalistic message and remains, to some extent, within the creative control of the writer, editor, and/or publisher.

There is no absolute agreement as to what constitutes digital journalism. Mu Lin argues that “Web and mobile platforms demand us to adopt a platform-free mindset for an all-inclusive production approach – create the contents first, then distribute via appropriate platforms.”

The repurposing of print content for an online audience is sufficient for some, while others require content created with the digital medium’s unique features like hypersexuality. Fondevila Gascón adds multimedia and interactivity to complete the digital journalism essence.

For Deuze, online journalism can be functionally differentiated from other kinds of journalism by its technological component which journalists have to consider when creating or displaying content.

Digital journalistic work may range from purely editorial content like CNN (produced by professional journalists) online to public-connectivity websites like Slashdot (communication lacking formal barriers of entry).

The difference between digital journalism from traditional journalism may be in its reconceptualized role of the reporter in relation to audiences and news organizations.

The expectations of society for instant information was important for the evolution of digital journalism. However, it is likely that the exact nature and roles of digital journalism will not be fully known for some time.

The first type of digital journalism, called Teletext, was invented in the UK in 1970. Teletext is a system allowing viewers to choose which stories they wish to read and see it immediately.

The information provided through Teletext is brief and instant, similar to the information seen in digital journalism today. The information was broadcast between the frames of a television signal in what was called the Vertical Blanking Interval or VBI.

American journalist, Hunter S. Thompson relied on early digital communication technology beginning by using a fax machine to report from the 1971 US presidential campaign trail as documented in his book Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail.

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After the invention of Teletext was the invention of videotex, of which Prestel was the world’s first system, launching commercially in 1979 with various British newspapers such as the Financial Times lining up to deliver newspaper stories online through it. Videotex closed down in 1986 due to failing to meet end-user demand.

American newspaper companies took notice of the new technology and created their own videotex systems, the largest and most ambitious being Viewtron, a service of Knight-Ridder launched in 1981. Others were Keycom in Chicago and Gateway in Los Angeles. All of them had closed by 1986.

Next came computer Bulletin Board Systems. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, several smaller newspapers started online news services using BBS software and telephone modems. The first of these was the Albuquerque Tribune in 1989.

Computer Gaming World in September 1992 broke the news of Electronic Arts’ acquisition of Origin Systems on Prodigy before its next issue went to press. Online news websites began to proliferate in the 1990s. An early adopter was The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina which offered online news as Nando.

Steve Yelvington wrote on the Poynter Institute website about Nando, owned by The N&O, by saying “Nando evolved into the first serious, professional news site on the World Wide Web”.It originated in the early 1990s as “Nando Land”.

It is believed that a major increase in digital online journalism occurred around this time when the first commercial web browsers, Netscape Navigator (1994), and Internet Explorer (1995).

By 1996, most news outlets had an online presence. Although journalistic content was repurposed from original text/video/audio sources without a change in substance, it could be consumed in different ways because of its online form through toolbars, topically grouped content, and intertextual links.

A twenty-four-hour news cycle and new ways of user-journalist interaction web boards were among the features unique to the digital format.

Later, portals such as AOL and Yahoo! and their news aggregators (sites that collect and categorize links from news sources) led to news agencies such as The Associated Press to supplying digitally suited content for aggregation beyond the limit of what client news providers could use in the past.

Also, Salon was founded in 1995. In 2001 the American Journalism Review called Salon the Internet’s “preeminent independent venue for journalism.”

In 2008, for the first time, more Americans reported getting their national and international news from the internet, rather than newspapers. Young people aged 18 to 29 now primarily get their news via the Internet, according to a Pew Research Center report.

Audiences to news sites continued to grow due to the launch of new news sites, continued investment in the news online by conventional news organizations, and the continued growth in internet audiences overall. Sixty-five percent of youth now primarily access the news online.

Mainstream news sites are the most widespread form of online newsmedia production. As of 2000, the vast majority of journalists in the Western world now use the internet regularly in their daily work.

In addition to mainstream news sites, digital journalism is found in index and category sites (sites without much original content but many links to existing news sites), meta- and comment sites (sites about newsmedia issues like media watchdogs), and share and discussion sites (sites that facilitate the connection of people, like Slashdot).

Blogs are also another digital journalism phenomenon capable of fresh information, ranging from personal sites to those with audiences of hundreds of thousands. Digital journalism is involved in the cloud journalism phenomenon, a constant flow of contents in the Broadband Society.