Patrick Enslow Biography, Age, Education, Career, Twitter, News

Patrick Enslow Biography

Patrick Enslow is an American Sports Director/Anchor & Multimedia Journalist at KTUU-TV. Deciding to pursue a degree in broadcast journalism, Patrick took on reporter and anchor roles at CTV, the campus news station. CTV provided a unique opportunity to cover a wide variety of stories, including the 2014 Colorado election, First Lady Michelle Obama’s visit to Fort Collins and the Colorado State 2014 football season.

Patrick Enslow Age

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Patrick Enslow Wife

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Patrick Enslow Education

Enslow graduated from Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

Patrick Enslow
                                        Patrick Enslow

Patrick Enslow Career

Enslow is an American Sports Director/Anchor & Multimedia Journalist at KTUU-TV. Patrick took on reporter and anchor roles at CTV, the campus news station. CTV provided a unique opportunity to cover a wide variety of stories, including the 2014 Colorado election, First Lady Michelle Obama’s visit to Fort Collins and the Colorado State 2014 football season. Patrick made his commitment to journalism a priority, even during the summer months of his junior year at CSU. He took on a summer internship at KTUU, gaining field experience working alongside experienced reporters and photojournalists. Patrick completed an additional internship in Denver at KDVR FOX 31 during his final semester of college. He is also a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Patrick says working for Channel 2 News is an exciting homecoming, having grown up watching KTUU every evening with family before dinner. Patrick is looking forward to the opportunity to travel his home state and tell Alaska’s story.

Patrick Enslow Twitter

Patrick Enslow News

Source: www.ktuu.com

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – The Yukon Quest announced Friday that it will be fine musher Brian Wilmshurst $3,262.10 after a urine test from his team tested positive for norketamine. In a press release, the race said though the foreign substance was possibly introduced from feeding tainted dog food, the Yukon Quest International Board of Directors made the decision to fine Wilmhurst because it’s the musher’s responsibility to ensure their dogs are free from prohibited substances.

Norketamine is an active metabolite of ketamine, which is used primarily for the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia. The Quest also added that YQI Veterinarians or Veterinary Assistants randomly collect blood and urine samples beginning at the Vet Check and up until two hours after a dog team has finished, scratched, or been withdrawn or disqualified from the race. Wilmshurst is a musher from Dawson City, Yukon Territory who’s been running dogs for the past 10 years. He’s finished the Quest five times.

LE HAVRE, France (AP) – The defending champion U.S. national team faced its toughest test of the Women’s World Cup and remained dominant Thursday night, beating Sweden 2-0 to serve up a measure of revenge against the team that stunned the confident Americans in the last Olympics. Lindsey Horan scored within the first three minutes, the fastest goal of this tournament. The United States went up 2-0 on an own goal by Jonna Andersson in the 50th minute that gave the Americans a tournament-record 18 goals in the group stage. The U.S. did not concede a goal in its first three matches. Already assured a spot in the round of 16 before the game, the United States finished atop its group and will head to Reims to face Spain on Monday. Sweden will play Canada in Paris.

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – Indiana’s Councilman Classic attracted some of the best swimmers in the world, and that included Seward’s Tsunami Swim Club’s, Lydia Jacoby. The 15-year-old Jacoby swam a personal best 1:10.11 in the 100m breaststroke, taking fifth overall. In her heat was Olympic gold medalist Lilly King who finished with a time of 1:07.33. King currently holds the world record in the 100m breaststroke with a time of 1:04.13. Last December, Jacoby qualified for the 2020 Olympic trials in Omaha, Nebraska.

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – Allie Ostrander is no stranger to making headlines on the track instead of social media. But the three-time national champion recently posted to Instagram about ESPN’s coverage of the NCAA Div. I outdoor track and field national championships. “I was disappointed with the commentary that has occurred during my races for the past two years. Both times, the comments have brought attention to my appearance more than my ability. In 2018, I was called ‘the baby faced assassin’ and told that I looked like I still played with Barbies. This year, the commentators found it necessary to state (incorrectly I might add) my height and weight multiple times. Not only were these comments objectifying and unnecessary, but they also drew attention away from the real focus of the event.”

Ostrander continued to drive home the point that commentary of these women’s events should focus on what women are capable of–not about their looks. “In a sport where eating disorders and body dysmorphia are so common, the media has an opportunity to help women (and men!) feel capable, powerful, and worthy, but, by focusing on appearance and body proportions, this opportunity is missed,” she wrote. “We greatly appreciate Allie bringing this important conversation to light. Commentary about height & weight was not broadcast on ESPN. The remark in question was made by the in-venue announcer at the championship,” wrote ESPN’s Amanda Brooks on Twitter.

As Ostrander’s success on the track grows, so does her fan base. And Ostrander is becoming known for her candid post-race interviews. For example, after Ostrander won her third straight steeplechase national championship, she had fun discussing the heat in Austin at the national championships that week. “I feel so hot right now, and not in an attractive way. I feel like I’m really low on the scale in that department,” Ostrander said in an interview.

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – Allie Ostrander kept her three-peat hopes alive Thursday by dominating the field in her heat of the 3,000-meter steeplechase semifinals and posting the top qualifying time ahead of the national finals that will take place this Saturday.

Ostrander, crossing the finish line in 09:44.32 in the second of two heats Thursday, captured the top 3,000-meter steeplechase qualifying time at the NCAA Div. I Track and Field National Championships in Austin, Texas. That time is also the fastest women’s steeplechase semifinal pace in NCAA history, with Ostrander breaking her own record from 2018 when she ran 9:45.96.

The Kenai native started out toward the back but quickly made her way to the front of the pack, staying there and winning by some 15 meters or so over her competition. Furman’s Gabrielle Jennings took second in the race, finishing in 9:47.84, a little more than three seconds after Ostrander. Ostrander, an alumna of Kenai Central High School, is looking to become the first woman ever to win three straight 3,000-meter steeplechase national championships.