Who is Retired Paul Meincke?Biography, Age, Family, Education, Career


Paul Meincke Biography

Paul Meincke is a retired Chicago Reporter and also worked in WLS-TV (Chicago, IL), he has also worked with ABC7 since 1985. Veteran reporter Paul Meincke joined ABC 7 Eyewitness News in July 1985. He was recognized with the Richard J. Daley Police Medal of Honor for serving as an intermediary in a hostage situation involving a wounded Chicago police officer in 2001. Meincke has covered many major news stories over the years the first Gulf war, the Branch Davidian stand-off in Texas, the arrest of the Unabomber, the 1999 release of captured U.S. servicemen in Belgrade, the death penalty debate in Illinois, as well as the political corruption trials of Governors Ryan and Blagojevich.

Paul Meincke Age

Retired Chicago TV reporter Meincke was born in Rock Island, Illinois. Information about his birth date and age has not been disclosed in the public yet.

Paul Meincke Family

Paul Meincke is extremely cautious and restrained when it comes to his personal life. The news anchor hasn’t spoken about his parents, siblings and his early life, moreover,  retired Chicago TV reporter Meincke was born Illinois and grew up on the Mississippi River, in Rock Island, Ill.

Paul Meincke Wife

Meincke has been married to Wendy for more than 30 years and their great joy is their four adult sons – Dan, Zach, Bill, and Cody.

Paul Meincke Children

Meincke together with his wife has four adult sons,

  • Dan
  • Zach
  • Bill
  • Cody

Paul Meincke Education

A native of Mississippi River, in Rock Island, Ill.  Illinois, Meincke received his Bachelor of Arts degree in speech from Augustana College.

Paul Meincke Image

Paul Meincke
Paul Meincke Image

Paul Meincke Career

Paul Meincke is a retired Chicago Reporter and also worked in WLS-TV (Chicago, IL), he has also worked with ABC7 since 1985. Veteran reporter Paul Meincke joined ABC 7 Eyewitness News in July 1985. Meincke has covered many major news stories over the years the first Gulf war, the Branch Davidian stand-off in Texas, the arrest of the Unabomber, the 1999 release of captured U.S. servicemen in Belgrade, the death penalty debate in Illinois, as well as the political corruption trials of Governors Ryan and Blagojevich.  Meincke began his career as a radio play-by-play announcer and would later anchor TV newscasts at WHBF-TV in his hometown of Rock Island, Illinois. He moved to WEWS-TV in Cleveland in 1981 where he served as a general assignment reporter and back-up anchor.

Meincke is a former Scoutmaster of Boy Scouts of America Troop 6 in Des Plaines and in 2003 was presented with the Silver Beaver Award, the highest award an adult volunteer can receive in recognition of time and effort. He has been active with the Boy Scouts for many years. When not reporting for Chicago’s top news station, Meincke has backpacked the Philmont Scout ranch five times, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2008 and bicycled across the U.S. in the summer of 2012.

Paul Meincke Retires

Veteran reporter Paul Meincke is Retired Channel 7 reporter Chicago TV reporter. Meincke began his career as a radio play-by-play announcer and would later anchor TV newscasts at WHBF-TV in his hometown of Rock Island, Illinois Chicago.

Paul Meincke Mississippi

Retired Channel 7 reporter Paul Meincke, grew up on the Mississippi River, in Rock Island, Ill. where together with his retired graybeards from suburban Chicago — Tim Clark, Tom Lobacz and Bill Baar visited the Mississippi’s headwaters at Lake Itasca, Minn.

Paul Meincke Interview

ABC7 reporter Paul Meincke finds adventure and angels on epic Mississippi canoe trip

Published: Aug 10, 2017

Source: www.chicagotribune.com

I grew up on the Mississippi River, in Rock Island, Ill. I knew of the river’s moods and might but always took it for granted. And yet I’d long wondered what it would be like to travel the Mississippi from source to sea — in a canoe.

So, after a decade of imagining and a year of serious preparation, I and three other retired graybeards from suburban Chicago — Tim Clark, Tom Lobacz and Bill Baar — headed north in late May to put in at the Mississippi’s headwaters at Lake Itasca, Minn.

The river begins as a baby stream gurgling past 25 feet of stones that permit you to “walk across the Mississippi” which, of course, we do. A webcam allows people to watch the “walkers” from afar. My wife calls to tell me she sees us. I wave.

For its first 60 miles, the Mississippi actually flows north, meandering through marshlands so expansive that an errant turn will find you lost. All of our gear is strapped into two, 18 1/2-foot Kevlar canoes: a single dome tent, a heavy kitchen set, several days’ worth of food and all our personal gear. Our campsites are “rustic” with names like Coffee Pot Landing and Fox Trap. Every bend in the river brings a new gift of wildlife. Loons offer up their tremolos. We’re entertained by trumpeter swans, river otters, and soaring eagles.

The Mississippi traverses three huge lakes in upper Minnesota — the biggest of which is Winnibigoshish. “Winnie” is 11 miles wide and notoriously temperamental. Our shoreline crossing is met with wind-driven white caps that bat us around in 3- and 4-foot swells.


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