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Rick Rydell Bio, Age, Family, Net Worth, Retirement And Podcasts.

Rick Rydell born Richard Green, is an American talk radio host, outdoorsman, writer and author. He has enjoyed a long career in radio, most prominently with various stations in the Northwest. His last job in radio was as the morning drive-time host on Anchorage station 650 KENI, until accepting a position in the Alaska Department of Fish and Game offered him by the governor in December 2018.

Rick Rydell Biography

Rick Rydell born Richard Green, is an American talk radio host, outdoorsman, writer and author. He has enjoyed a long career in radio, most prominently with various stations in the Northwest. His last job in radio was as the morning drive-time host on Anchorage station 650 KENI, until accepting a position in the Alaska Department of Fish and Game offered him by the governor in December 2018.

Rick Rydell Age

Richard Green was born in Seattle, Washington, U.S. on 29th September 29, 1963. As of 2018, he is 55 years.

Rick Rydell Family

Richard Green was born on September 29, 1963 in Seattle, Washington. He grew up in a working-class family. His mother worked for Boeing as a general laborer, while his father worked as a toolmaker for Heath Tecna, a supplier to Boeing. He had three older sisters, one of whom had Down syndrome and died at age 3. He spent his second birthday in a hospital with his father, who was recovering from cancer-induced amputation of one of his legs.

At the beginning of second grade, the family moved to Payette, Idaho for a new job. It lasted only eight months. The family then moved to Billings, Montana where his father began a new career in radio. 

At the age of 16, his parents told him to find a job or move out. In response, he got a job and moved out. His baseball coach was the program director at KGHL, and offered him a job, with one condition: changing his last name to avoid confusion with his father’s radio program. It was then that the radio personality Rick Rydell was born.

In an interview, he said he didn’t finish high school but received a GED after moving to Alaska.

Rick Rydell Wife

There is no information about his personal life. He has kept his life off the cameras though when clear it will be updated.

Rick Rydell Photo

Rick Rydell Net Worth

Rydell is a talk radio host, outdoorsman, writer and author though he is retired. His net worth is still under review but will be updated as soon as it’s clear.

Rick Rydell Career

Rydell first gained fame in radio in Spokane, Washington with following gigs in KXYQ and KMJK in Portland, Oregon, then a two-year stint in Cleveland at WNCX. He was the anchor on the morning show that launched Mike Trivisonno and Todd Brandt into radio fame.

In 1990, he was fired and he moved to Anchorage, Alaska. There, he was hired at a relatively new station, KBFX. Various stations had floundered at the 100.5 frequency in Anchorage for over a decade before it was relaunched as KBFX, playing a classic rock format. Rydell spent a number of years during the early and mid-1990s as KBFX’s morning show host, the last several years with co-host Jackie Purcell, the weather director for Anchorage television station KTUU.

Rydell was fired again in 1996, and he suddenly found himself out of work. He spent several years away from Anchorage and away from radio, mostly working in construction. In 2001, he returned to Anchorage and made the transition to talk radio, following the retirement of KENI’s longtime morning host Dick Lobdell.

His program focused on local and state politics and current events. The show shot up from 17th to #1 within six months and remained a highly-rated show for years. Rydell then broadcast weekday mornings on 650 KENI.  Previously he simulcasted his show to Fairbanks station KFBX, as well as contributed commentaries to the station’s newscasts.

Some of the awards for his various radio programs, include: “Best Morning Show” by The Oregonian in 1988, “Best Comedy Series” in 1994, “Best Radio Show” in 2005, and “Most Uniquely Alaskan Radio Show” in 2006 by the Alaska Broadcasters Association. He himself was named Alaska Republican Man of the Year for 2004 by the Republican Party of Alaska. In 2012, he was referred to as an “All-Time Great Local Host” during the Conclave Learning Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Rydell was a founding member of the Alaska Moose Federation and on the radio repeatedly used the phrase “Don’t be a turd, rebuild the herd” in support of active game management measures in the early 2000s,

He retired from radio in December 2018 after accepting a position in the Alaska Department of Fish and Game offered him by the governor.

Rick Rydell Bibliography

He has three books;

  • In September 2007, his first book, Alaska Happens, was published. Its a book of short stories about hunting and fishing in Alaska. Alaska Happens became one of the best selling Alaska books at local book stores.
  • September 2008, Blood on the Tundra. More Hunting, Fishing and Wildlife in Alaska, was published and released. A follow up to “Alaska Happens” and reported to have “a nostalgic tone to some of the stories” and “a sad farewell to the waning “golden age” of hunting in Alaska during the last half of the 20th century.
  • May 2009, began as a regular article contributor for Fish Alaska and Hunt Alaska magazines.

Rick Rydell Podcast

You can listen to his podcasts on www.iheart.com and podcasts.apple.com

Rick Rydell Retires

In December 2018, he retired from radio after accepting a position in the Alaska Department of Fish and Game offered him by the governor.

Rick Rydell signs off to begin Fish & Game job for Dunleavy

Anchorage talk radio host Richard Green, known on the airwaves as Rick Rydell, has been named a special assistant to acting Department of Fish and Game commissioner Doug Vincent-Lang, the department announced Friday.

Green was among three Fish and Game appointees named by the administration of Gov. Mike Dunleavy. The other two are deputy commissioner Benjamin Mulligan and Edward Grasser, director of the Division of Wildlife Conservation.

Green, who was born and raised in Montana, said he goes by Rydell on the air because his father — also named Rick Green — was also a radio host. The Alaska Green had his last radio show Friday, signing off on KENI-AM 650 before starting his new position Monday. He also has broadcast in Spokane, Washington.

“Radio host is only one small facet of who and what I am,” Green said by phone, speaking to Alaskans who might be surprised by the move.

Green said he has also worked as a professional hunting guide and at various times as a project manager for environmental and engineering firms.

Green didn’t finish high school but received a GED after moving to Alaska, he told the Daily News in a 2003 interview and confirmed by phone Monday. The biography released by the department calls him an “accomplished outdoorsman (who) has written two books. He is a lifelong member of the National Rifle Association, a member of the Outdoor Council and a former hunting and fishing guide. He served on the Fish and Game Advisory Council for three years.”

Rydell was a founding member of the Alaska Moose Federation and on the radio repeatedly used the phrase “Don’t be a turd, rebuild the herd” in support of active game management measures in the early 2000s, according to contemporary accounts.

“It was a time of differing opinion on game policy, and it was a cute alliteration catchphrase trying to bring attention to the issue,” he said.

He said he does not expect his on-air comments will affect his relationships with state biologists.

Rick Green, aka Rick Rydell, emceed the Republican Rally at Anchorage Christian Schools on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, two days before Election Day. (Bill Roth / ADN)

Green’s job, according to the department’s announcement, will involve “outreach to user groups.” His annual salary is $86,928, according to a Fish and Game spokeswoman.

Deputy Commissioner Mulligan, who will make $127,260 a year, was a special assistant and legislative liaison for Fish and Game from 2010 to 2015. He then joined the staff of the Alaska Chamber of Commerce, rising to become vice president. Before joining Fish and Game, he worked in the office of Sen. Bill Stoltze, R-Chugiak, including as chief of staff. He has a bachelor’s degree in biology with a fisheries emphasis from the University of Wyoming, according to the biography provided by the department.

Grasser, who will make $122,988 as a division director, is registered as a lobbyist with the state. In 2018 he registered to lobby state officials and legislators on behalf of the Safari Club’s Alaska chapter and, for Harris Consulting, on issues related to the Matanuska-Susitna Borough.

Grasser served as a vice president for the Safari Club International Alaska Chapter and has a long history with big-game hunting in Alaska. His father, Marlin Grasser, owned and operated Alaska Guides and Outfitters before his death in 2009. According to an obituary published by the Daily News at that time, Grasser and Mulligan are related — Grasser is Mulligan’s uncle.

According to the biography provided by Fish and Game, Grasser spent five years working as chief of staff to the Alaska House Resources Committee and was a special assistant to the commissioner of Fish and Game from 2005 to 2006.

The biography also states that Grasser “has played active roles with the Alaska Outdoor Council, the Alaska Fish and Wildlife Federation and other outdoor groups.”

Among those other outdoor groups is the Outdoor Heritage Foundation of Alaska, which lists Grasser as its president in its latest available tax filings. Those filings also show Vincent-Lang and Mulligan as directors of the organization.

The foundation is the official foundation of Fish and Game and accepts donations that benefit Fish and Game programs. It is a sponsor of various Fish and Game programs, including Becoming an Outdoors-Woman and Alaskans Afield.

Adopted from: www.adn.com