Steve Somers Biography, Age, Wife, WFAN, Illness,Radio, Salary And Net Worth - instantbios.com | instantbios.com Steve Somers Biography, Age, Wife, WFAN, Illness,Radio, Salary And Net Worth - instantbios.com

Steve Somers Biography, Age, Wife, WFAN, Illness,Radio, Salary And Net Worth

Steve Somers Biography

Steve Somers is an American talk radio host.  He is best known for his work on the New York City sports radio station WFAN (660 AM). He has been with the station since its inception in 1987. Affectionately know as the “Smoozer” or “Captain Midnight” he was a fixture of the station’s overnight until 1995 when he was Teamed with WWOR UPN 9 Sportscaster Russ Salzberg on the 10 am to 1 pm shift this teaming gave WFAN’s it’s best midday ratings ever. From time to time callers will bring up his brief appearance as a reporter in the 1979 Movie Visitor.

Steve Somers Age

Steve was born on April 17, 1947 in San Francisco, california. He is 73 years old as of 2019.

Steve Somers Family

Steve was born in San Francisco, but you’d never know it. He grew up speaking like someone from Brooklyn. “When I was a kid, people thought I was from back East,” he said, and he added that he probably picked up a lot of characteristically Jewish inflections from his parents, who ran a mom-and-pop grocery. “When you hear me, you’re hearing them,” he said.

Steve Somers Education

Steve  went to Lowell High School, an elite magnet school in San Francisco  where Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer is an alumnus.  He was valedictorian of his class, but his ambition even then was to be a New York sportscaster. “I wanted to play Broadway,” he said. “And I am — I’m a long-running play.”

Steve’s goal was not radio, however, but television. He imagined himself the next Warner Wolf, and after starting out in radio, he did TV sports for 17 years in San Francisco, Sacramento, Atlanta and Los Angeles. He lost his job in 1984, and was out of work for two and a half years. When WFAN called in 1987, he hadn’t done radio in decades.

Steve Somers Wife

Steve is single since he has never mentioned anything about his wife or children. He has kept his love life away from public despite of him being a celebrity.

Steve Sommers Photo

Steve Somers WFAN

Steve joined WFAN at the station’s inception in July 1987. He spent his first few years with the station as the overnight host. During this time he conducted one of the last ever interviews with Mark Koenig who was the last living member of the 1927 New York Yankees. He later spent a few years co-hosting the 10am-1pm slot with WWOR-TV sports anchor Russ Salzberg. The program was titled “The Sweater and the Schmoozer.”

During that time, Steve  developed some of the quirks that have been hallmarks of his WFAN tenure, dropping catchphrases such as “schmoooooozing S-P-O-R-T-S” (spelling out the word “sports”), giving time checks in minutes and seconds, uniquely reading the end of the station’s phone number as “six-six-six-six” rather than the standard “sixty six-sixty six”, joking at the expense of engineer Eddie Scozzare (“THE Eddie Scozzare?” “No, Eddie Maple, who do you think we’re talking?”), and reading the catalogue numbers of live commercials (“LV-242, for those of you scoring at home…”). He is also known to refer to the New York Mets, by one of their nicknames (which is not their official name) “The New York Metropolitans” drawing out the parts as Metro-Politans.

Currently, Steve usually works during the evening on weekdays. Steve’s program can be heard anywhere from 6:30pm to 2am, depending on whether WFAN airs a sporting event that night. Sometimes he is also heard on weekends. Steve is nicknamed as “The Schmoozer.”  Steve has said of the infrequent scheduling, “Sometimes, just sometimes, I forget what time zone I live in.”

Steve Somers Salary | Steve Somers Net Worth

Steve has an estimated net worth of $900,000 but her salary is not yet revealed.

Steve Somers Illness

Steve is still healthy.  An old fart,” he said one recent morning at 2 a.m. after completing his late-night-but-not-quite-overnight shift and shortly after returning from an illness-related hiatus. “I’m the oldest guy here, I’m sure.”