Wolverine (James Howlett) Bio, Daughter, Powers, Movies, Logan and Death. | instantbios.com Wolverine (James Howlett) Bio, Daughter, Powers, Movies, Logan and Death.

Wolverine (James Howlett) Bio, Daughter, Powers, Movies, Logan and Death.

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Wolverine (James Howlett) Bio

Wolverine (James Howlett) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, mostly in association with the X-Men. He is a mutant who possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, powerful regenerative ability known as a healing factor, and three retractable claws in each hand.

Wolverine has been depicted variously as a member of the X-Men, Alpha Flight, and The Avengers.

The character appeared in the last panel of The Incredible Hulk before having a larger role. He was created by Marvel editor-in-chief Roy Thomas, writer Len Wein, and Marvel art director John Romita Sr. Romita designed the character, although it was first drawn for publication by Herb Trimpe.

Wolverine then joined a revamped version of the superhero team the X-Men, where eventually writer Chris Claremont and artist-writer John Byrne would play significant roles in the character’s development.

Artist Frank Miller collaborated with Claremont and helped revise the character with a four-part eponymous limited series from September to December 1982, which debuted Wolverine’s catchphrase, “I’m the best there is at what I do, but what I do best isn’t very nice.”

Wolverine is typical of the many tough antiheroes that emerged in American popular culture after the Vietnam War his willingness to use deadly force and his brooding nature became standard characteristics for comic book antiheroes by the end of the 1980s.

As a result, the character became a fan favorite of the increasingly popular X-Men franchise and has been featured in his own solo comic book series since 1988.

He has appeared in most X-Men adaptations, including animated television series, video games, and the live-action 20th Century Fox X-Men film series, in which he is portrayed by Hugh Jackman in nine of the twelve films. Troye Sivan portrayed a younger version in the 2009 film X-Men Origins: Wolverine.

The character is highly rated in many comics best-of lists, ranked in Wizard magazine’s 2008 Top 200 Comic Book Characters; 4th in Empire’s 2008 Greatest Comic Characters; and 4th on IGN’s 2011 Top 100 Comic Book Heroes.

Wolverine (James Howlett) Daughter

X-23 real name Laura Kinney; alias Wolverine is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, most commonly in association with the X-Men.

X-23 was apparently the clone and later adopted daughter of Wolverine, created to be the perfect killing machine. For years, she proved herself a capable assassin working for an organization called the Facility. A series of tragedies eventually led her to Wolverine and the X-Men.

She attended school at the X-Mansion, and eventually became a member of X-Force. Like Wolverine, X-23 has a regenerative healing factor and enhanced senses, speed, and reflexes. She also has retractable adamantium-coated bone claws in her hands and feet. In 2015, the character succeeded her father in adopting the name and costume of Wolverine in the series All-New Wolverine. In July 2018, the character returned to her original moniker of X-23.

Wolverine (James Howlett) Powers and Abilities

Wolverine is a mutant with a number of both natural and artificial improvements to his physiology.

Healing and defensive powers

His primary mutant power is an accelerated healing process, typically referred to as his mutant healing factor, that regenerates damaged or destroyed tissues of his body far beyond the capabilities of an ordinary human. In addition to accelerated healing of physical traumas, Wolverine’s healing factor makes him extraordinarily resistant to diseases, drugs, and toxins.

However, he can still suffer the immediate effects of such substances in massive quantities; he has been shown to become intoxicated after ingesting significant amounts of alcohol, and has been incapacitated on several occasions with large amounts of powerful drugs and poisons; S.H.I.E.L.D. once managed to keep Wolverine anesthetized by constantly pumping eighty milliliters of anesthetic a minute into his system.

His healing factor is facilitated by artificial improvements he was subjected to under the Weapon X program (in later comics called the Weapon Plus program), in which his skeleton was reinforced with the virtually indestructible metal adamantium.

Wolverine (James Howlett)

While the adamantium in his body stops or reduces many injuries, his healing factor must also work constantly to prevent metal poisoning from killing him. when his healing powers were rendered inactive, Beast synthesized a drug to counteract the adamantium poisoning.

His healing factor also dramatically affects his aging process, allowing him to live far beyond the normal lifespan of a human.

Despite being born in the late 19th century, he has the appearance, conditioning, health, and vitality of a man in his physical prime. While seemingly ageless, it is unknown exactly how greatly his healing factor extends his life expectancy.

Although his body heals, the healing factor does not suppress the pain he endures while injured. Wolverine also admits to feeling phantom pains for weeks or months after healing from his injuries. He does not enjoy being hurt and sometimes has to work himself up for situations where extreme pain is certain.

Wolverine, on occasion, has deliberately injured himself or allowed himself to be injured for varying reasons, including freeing himself from capture, intimidation, strategy, or simply indulging his feral nature. Though he now has all of his memories, his healing abilities can provide increased recovery from psychological trauma by suppressing memories in which he experiences profound distress.

Depictions of the speed and extent of injury to which Wolverine can heal vary due to a broad degree of artistic license employed by various comic book writers. Originally, this was portrayed as accelerated healing of minor wounds, though Chris Claremont, head writer of the X-Men comics from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s increased Wolverine’s healing factor substantially, though not nearly as much as later writers would.

During the 1980s, Wolverine’s mutant healing factor is depicted as being able to heal massive levels of trauma, though his recovery time could extend to days, weeks or months before fully healing; often depending upon the severity of the injuries, their extent and the frequency with which they’re inflicted.

During the 1990s through the modern era, other writers have increased Wolverine’s healing factor to the point that it could fully regenerate nearly any damaged or destroyed bodily tissues within seconds.

Among the more extreme depictions of Wolverine’s healing factor include fully healing after being caught near the center of an atomic explosion and the total regeneration of his soft body tissue, within a matter of minutes, after having it incinerated from his skeleton. An explanation is given in a recent mini-series starring Wolverine for the increase of his healing powers.

In the series, Wolverine is referred to as an “adaptive self-healer” after undergoing numerous traumatic injuries to test the efficiency of his healing factor. Wolverine has endured so much trauma, and so frequently, that his healing factor has adapted, becoming faster and more efficient to cope with increasing levels of trauma.

The Xavier Protocols, a series of profiles created by Xavier that lists the strengths and weaknesses of the X-Men, says that Wolverine’s healing factor is increased to “incredible levels” and theorizes that the only way to stop him is to decapitate him and remove his head from the vicinity of his body.

It is possible to suppress the efficiency of his healing powers. For example, if an object composed of carbonation is inserted and remains lodged within his body, his healing powers are slowed dramatically. The Muramasa blade, a katana of mystic origins that can inflict wounds that nullify superhuman healing factors, can also suppress Wolverine’s powers.

It has also been noted that Wolverine needs protein for his healing factor to generate tissue, meaning that if he was seriously injured and malnourished, his body might not be able to repair itself. His healing factor has also been turned off using nanites.

It has been suggested that Wolverine can be killed by drowning. He has said that he is not particularly fond of being in the water, due partially to the weight of his adamantium laced skeleton and that he can die if held underwater long enough — his healing factor would only prolong the agony. The two-part story arc “Drowning Logan” finds Wolverine trapped underwater for an extensive period of time.

The second part of the story arc hints that this experience weakens his healing factor and future health. Following “Drowning Logan”, Beast reveals that an “intelligent virus” originating from the Microverse has shut off his healing factor, though not before it purged his body of the virus, leaving him as susceptible to injury, disease, and aging as any ordinary human.

Wolverine reveals that when Wolverine is injured so seriously that his body actually dies before his healing factor can repair the damage, he returns to life by fighting with Azrael, the Angel of Death, while trapped in Purgatory because Wolverine defeated Azrael in real-world combat during World War I.

However, after Wolverine’s resurrection and brainwashing by the Hand, he made a new deal with Azrael that repaired the damage to his soul, negated their previous arrangement, and weakened his healing factor slightly — and the next time Wolverine sustains death-inducing injuries, he will remain dead.

Due to a combination of his healing factor and high-level psionic shields implanted by Professor Xavier, Wolverine’s mind is highly resistant to telepathic assault and probing. Wolverine’s mind also possesses what he refers to as “mental scar tissue” created by the traumatic events of his life. It acts as a type of natural defense, even against a psychic as powerful as Emma Frost.

Other abilities

Wolverine’s mutation also consists of animal-like adaptations of his body, including pronounced, and sharp fang-like canines and three retractable claws housed within each forearm. While originally depicted as bionic implants created by the Weapon X program, the claws are later revealed to be a natural part of his body. The claws are not made of keratin, as claws tend to be in the animal kingdom, but extremely dense bone.

Wolverine’s hands do not have openings for the claws to move through: they cut through his flesh every time he extrudes them, with occasional references implying that he feels a brief moment of slight pain in his hands when he unsheathes them.

During a talk to Jubilee, Wolverine reveals that there are channels inside his forearms through which the claws move when he extrudes them and that he unsheathes the claws a few times a day to keep the channels open, similar to pierced ears.

Wolverine’s senses of sight, smell, and hearing are all superhumanly acute. He can see with perfect clarity at greater distances than an ordinary human, even in near-total darkness. His hearing is enhanced in a similar manner, allowing him to hear sounds ordinary humans cannot and also hear to greater distances.

Wolverine is able to use his sense of smell to track targets by scent, even if the scent has been eroded somewhat over time by natural factors. This sense also allows him to identify shapeshifting mutants despite other forms they may take. He is also able to use his senses of smell and hearing, through concentration, as a type of natural lie detectors, such as detecting a faint change in a person’s heartbeat and scent due to perspiration when a lie is told.

On more than one occasion, Wolverine’s entire skeleton, including his claws, has been molecularly infused with adamantium. Due to their coating, his claws can cut almost any known solid material, including most metals, wood, and some varieties of stone. The only known exceptions are adamantium itself and Captain America’s shield, which is made out of a proto-adamantium-vibranium alloy.

Vibranium alone is not comparable in terms of durability with adamantium and has been broken by Colossus. Wolverine’s ability to slice completely through a substance depends upon both the amount of force he can exert and the thickness of the substance. His claws can also be used to block attacks or projectiles, as well as dig into surfaces allowing Wolverine to climb structures.

The adamantium also adds weight to his blows, increasing the effectiveness of his offensive capabilities. His adamantium skeleton makes him highly susceptible to magnetic-based attacks. According to Reed Richards, Wolverine would be unable to move without his enhanced strength due to the additional weight of the adamantium bonded to his skeleton.

Wolverine’s healing factor also affects a number of his physical attributes by increasing them to superhuman levels. His stamina is sufficiently heightened to the point he can exert himself for numerous hours, even after exposure to powerful tranquilizers. Wolverine’s agility and reflexes are also enhanced to levels that are beyond the physical limits of the finest human athlete.

Due to his healing factor’s constant regenerative qualities, he can push his muscles beyond the limits of the human body without injury. This, coupled with the constant demand placed on his muscles by over one hundred pounds of adamantium, grants him some degree of superhuman strength.

Since the presence of the adamantium negates the natural structural limits of his bones, he can lift or move weight that would otherwise damage a human skeleton.

He has been depicted breaking steel chains, lifting several men above his head with one arm and throwing them through a wall, lifting Ursa Major over his head before tossing him across a room, and hauling a concert grand piano, and the platform it rests on, via a harness, while climbing a sheer cliff.

Colossus and other allies use Wolverine’s endurance and strength when throwing him at high speed in the Fastball Special. In the upcoming Return of Wolverine limited series, Wolverine will gain the ability to heat up his adamantium claws to where they can reach high-level temperatures.

Wolverine (James Howlett) Movies and TV Shows

1. X-Men: Evolution
2. X-Men
3. Wolverine and the X-Men

4. The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes
5. Hulk Vs.
6. Wolverine

7. X-Men: Pryde of the X-Men
8. The Super Hero Squad Show
9. X-Men since 2011

Wolverine (James Howlett) Logan

Wolverine was born as James Howlett, the illegitimate son to John Howlett, Sr. (Earth-616) and Elizabeth Hudson (Earth-616).

James had a brother named John who was killed by his own father, John Howlett Sr. after he had developed his mutant abilities and assaulted his mother. John’s mutant abilities also manifested in growing out claws from his hands.

After this incident, Elizabeth went mad and when sent back to the estate, had an affair with the man named Thomas Logan (Earth-616). The result was the birth of James Howlett, Wolverine. John Howlett Sr. wasn’t aware of the affair as it was a well-hidden secret and he thought James was his legitimate son.

James grew up in the estate happy, despite his fragile state, until the fateful night when Thomas Logan (Earth-616), assaulted John Howlett Sr. and killed him. James went into a frenzy and killed Thomas Logan, who unbeknownst to him, was his real father.

Wolverine (James Howlett) Death

In September and October 2014, the “Death of Wolverine” storyline began after a virus from the microverse turned off Wolverine’s healing factor, allowing his enemies to be able to kill him. Heroes such as Mister Fantastic offered to work on finding a means of reactivating his healing factor.

When he learned that a bounty had been placed on his head, Logan resolved to find his foe, eventually identifying it as Doctor Abraham Cornelius, the founder of the Weapon X program.

After defeating Dr. Cornelius’ latest experiment, Wolverine slashed the adamantium container before it could be infected with Dr. Cornelius’ chemicals and Wolverine gets covered in it during the process. Wolverine dies from suffocation from the hardening adamantium.

Wolverine

Wanting to possess Logan, Ogun traveled to the Paradise facility to find him already dead, so instead, he made Sharp his host.

His body was later seen still kneeling on the roof when the subjects led by Sharp escaped Weapon X soldiers looking to retrieve them and escaped the lab in a helicopter, and was last seen caught in an explosion on the roof.

Post mortem and legacy

The aftermath of Wolverine’s death is explored in the series Wolverines.

Sharp, Skel, Neuro, Endo, Junk, and the “Wolverines” (a team formed from the fallout of his death by Daken, Lady Deathstrike, Mystique, Sabretooth, and X-23) try to find Logan’s adamantium-covered body, which is taken by Mister Sinister. The group infiltrates Mister Sinister’s fortress to retrieve the body, but it is taken by the X-Men after a battle.

As one of his last requests, Wolverine arranged for Spider-Man to become a member of the Jean Grey School for Higher Learning’s staff, wanting Spider-Man to investigate a suspected double agent. Despite the initial hostility he faced from the rest of the team, Spider-Man soon exposed a plan by Mister Sinister to acquire genetic samples from the X-Men and create a new clone army.

The storm even noted after Sinister’s defeat that Spider-Man’s unconventional attitude made him more like Wolverine than she had acknowledged.

Black Widow tracked a knife covered in Wolverine’s blood in the possession of A.I.M. to a research facility in Moscow. Captain America and Deadpool went to retrieve it in order to prevent A.I.M. from misusing Wolverine’s DNA. Deadpool was given the blood-covered knife by Captain America to do with it as he wanted.

Deadpool had recently acquired an incubator that could create new bodies using a DNA sample. Deadpool deferred the decision to bring Wolverine back to life until he had more time to think about whether it would have been what Wolverine wanted.

X-23 begins wearing a variation of Wolverine’s costume and adopts his codename.

An alternate timeline version of Wolverine known as Old Man Logan who arrives after the Secret Wars from Earth-807128 is invited to join the Extraordinary X-Men. Old Man Logan was shown the adamantium-frozen body of the present-era Wolverine to prove that this wasn’t the elderly Logan’s past.

In the afterlife, Wolverine makes a brief reappearance when he, Phoenix and Amanda Sefton encourage Nightcrawler, who has just been fatally stabbed by the Crimson Pirates, to return to the land of the living.

Resurrection

In Marvel Legacy, he time-displaced Jean Grey discovers the adamantium shell in Wolverine’s grave has been cracked open and is empty. Meanwhile, Wolverine acquires the Space Infinity Gem after killing the Frost Giant that was targeting it on Loki’s behalf.

Later, Logan tries unsuccessfully to rekindle his relationship with Captain America, Jane Foster, Spider-Man, the Avengers, and other heroes. While he initially refused to join the X-Men, he secretly observed the preparations for the wedding of Kitty and Colossus, wishing them good luck.